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Wayne Moorehead

Wayne Moorehead

Main Content

  • Senior Instructor/Senior Research Assistant
325 Whitmore Lab
University Park, PA PA
Email: wxm25@psu.edu
Phone: (814) 863-6769

Education

  1. Master of Science: Criminalistics, California State University Los Angeles (4.0), 2000
  2. Bachelor of Science: Criminalistics, University of California, Berkeley, 1977

Biography

Additional Education

  1. Graduate course work in criminalistics, University of California, Berkeley, eleven units, 1976-1977
  2. Graduate course work in criminalistics, California State University, Los Angeles, three units, 1982
  3. Drug Enforcement Administration, Forensic Chemist Seminar, one week, 1978
  4. McCrone Research Institute, Basic Forensic Microscopy, Modesto, California, one week, 1979
  5. Photography and Darkroom Techniques, Monterey Peninsula College, three units, 1979
  6. Basic Photography and Darkroom Techniques, University of California Extension, Berkeley, three units, 1980
  7. Microscopy of Explosives, McCrone Research Institute, Santa Ana, California, one week, 1981
  8. Soil Microscopy, McCrone Research Institute, Santa Ana, California, one week, 1982
  9. Bombing Crime Scene Investigators School, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Anaheim, California, one week, 1982
  10. International Journal of Scanning Electron Microscopists Seminar, Asbestos topics, Anaheim, California, eight hours, 1982
  11. Arson Accelerant School, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, Rockville, Maryland, one week, 1983
  12. High Performance Liquid Chromatography, Federal Bureau of Investigation Training Academy FSRTC, Quantico, Virginia, one week, 1983
  13. Bombing Crime Scene and Explosives Analysis Course, Federal Bureau of Investigation Training Academy FSRTC, Quantico, Virginia, two weeks, 1984
  14. Bomb Scene Investigation Course, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, Anaheim, California, total two weeks, 1984 and 1987
  15. Gas Chromatography Seminar, Varian Instruments, eight hours, 1985
  16. Advanced Explosives Technology, Bombing, and Terrorism Trends, International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators, eight hours, 1985
  17. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, Advanced Arson Analysis Workshop, Las Vegas, NV, eig
  18. Lecture by Dr. Dubowski at a private Toxicology Laboratory in Colton, California, one hour, 1985
  19. Intoxilyzer® 5000 Training, Colorado Mountain Instruments Corporation, Santa Ana, California, three days, 1986
  20. Arson Topics – Continuing Education, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Engineering Section, four hours, 1987
  21. Chromatographic Methods in Forensic Science, Federal Bureau of Investigation Training Academy FSRTC, Quantico, VA, two weeks, 1987
  22. Introduction to Geology and Geology Laboratory, Rancho Santiago College, Santa Ana, four units, 1987
  23. Superstars of Drunk Driving Seminar, Anaheim, CA sixteen hours, 1987
  24. Problem Solving Seminar in Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Spectra-Tech, eight hours, 1988
  25. J & W Scientific Capillary Gas Chromatography Seminar, Santa Ana, California, eight hours, 1988
  26. Bombing Crime Scene Investigation, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Anaheim, California, three days, 1989
  27. Advanced Asbestos Analysis, McCrone Research Institute, one week, Hayward, California, January 1990
  28. Orange County Sheriff's Department Homicide Crime Scene Investigators Course, Anaheim, California, one week, September 1990
  29. Trace Evidence Symposium, Federal Bureau of Investigation Training Academy FSRTC, Quantico, Virginia, one week, 1991
  30. Spectra-Tech IR-Plan Fourth Annual Users Group Meeting, Anaheim, California, three hours, October 1991
  31. Occult Crime Investigation, 8 hours, San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, October 18, 1991
  32. FTIR seminar, Federal Bureau of Investigation Training Academy FSRTC, Quantico, Virginia, one week, 1992
  33. Advanced Microscopic Techniques, McCrone Research Institute, Los Angeles, California, one week, 1993
  34. Homicide Investigation, Orange County Sheriff Department, one week, fall 1993
  35. Fiber Microscopy, McCrone Research Institute, Hayward, California, one week, 1994
  36. Fire and Explosion Investigations for the Insurance Investigator, California Criminalistics Institute, Sacramento, California, one week, 1994
  37. InterMicro, Seminar on Microscopy, Chicago, Illinois, four or three days: A)   1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2014
  38. Paper Fiber Identification Microscopy Workshop, State Microscopical Society of Illinois/MRI, Chicago, Illinois, eight hours, 1994
  39. Arson Accelerant Detection course, California Criminalistics Institute, Sacramento, California, one week, 1994
  40. Microchemical Techniques, McCrone Research Institute, Santa Ana, California, one week, 1995
  41. CADA, NFPA, IAAI, ASTM Meeting, Burlingame, CA, two days, 1995
  42. Polaroid Photomicrography Workshop, State Microscopical Society of Illinois/MRI, Chicago, Illinois, eight hours, 1995
  43. International Symposium on the Forensic Aspects of Arson Investigations, Federal Bureau of Investigation, George Mason University, one week, 1995
  44. Conversational DNA, CAC Semi-Annual Seminar, 4 hours, October 1995
  45. Board of Examinations Workshop, two hours, CAC Semi-Annual Seminar, October 1995
  46. Pathology of Wounds, California Criminalistics Institute, Sacramento, California, one week, November 1995
  47. California Major Explosive Incident Contingency Plan, International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators, Berkeley, CA, two days, April 1996
  48. Contrast Methods-Phase, Darkfield, and Rheinberg Workshop, Mortimer Abramowitz, State Microscopical Society Of Illinois/McCrone Research Institute, Chicago, IL, eight hours, 1996
  49. Identification of Soils and Minerals, CCI Sacramento, one week, October 1996
  50. Feather Identification, Private Workshop with Roxie Laybourne, Smithsonian Institute, one week, Spring 1997
  51. Dispersion Staining Workshop, Dr. Walter McCrone, State Microscopical Society Of Illinois/McCrone Research Institute, Chicago, IL., eight hours, 1997
  52. Illumination; the Essence of Visibility Workshop, Nichols LeMieux, State Microscopical Society Of Illinois/McCrone Research Institute, Chicago, IL three hours, August 1998
  53. Dispersion of Optical Properties of Crystals Workshop, Dr. Walter McCrone, State Microscopical Society Of Illinois/McCrone Research Institute, Chicago, IL, three hours, August 1998
  54. Animal Hair Identification, CCI, Sacramento, one week, February, 1999
  55. Seminar on Microscopy & Hair Comparison Symposium, INTER/MICRO-1999, Chicago, IL, eight hours, July 1999
  56. Spindle Stage Methods Workshop, Dr. Donald Bloss, McCrone Research Institute, Chicago, IL., two days, July 1999
  57. Hair Identification and Comparison, CCI, Sacramento, one week, February, 2000
  58. Suicide Bomber Seminar, Garden Grove, CA., two days, October 2004
  59. Trace Evidence Workshop, one-day, California Association of Criminalists Semi-Annual Seminar, Ventura, CA, October 2004
  60. Working with Living Cells: Triumphs, Tribulations, and Tragedies, InterMicro-2007 Workshop, one-day, July 12, 2007
  61. Airborne and Settled Dust Particle Identification, InterMicro-2007 Workshop, one-day, July 13, 2007
  62. Workshop in Fluorescence Microscopy, InterMicro-2008, one-day, July 11, 2008
  63. Fire Death Investigation, San Luis Obispo Fire Investigation Strike Team, San Luis Obispo, CA, June 2009
  64. Advanced Explosives Recognition, Fireworks, Central Valley Arson Investigators, Tulare, CA, one day, May 8, 2010, Frank Furtaw
  65. California Association of Toxicologists, Annual Meeting, November 12, 2010
  66. Advanced Explosives Recognition, Home Made Explosives, Central Valley Arson Investigators, Tulare, CA, one-day, May 14, 2011, Frank Furtaw
  67. Food Microscopy Workshop, State Microscopical Society of Illinois, Chicago, IL, two-days, July 2011, Skip Palenik
  68. Trace Evidence Symposium, National Institute of Justice, Kansas City, MO., August 8 -11, 2011.
  69. Advanced Explosives Recognition, Central Valley Arson Investigators, Tulare, CA, one-day, May 12, 2012, Frank Furtaw
  70. Scanning Electron Microscopy, Hooke College of Applied Sciences, Westmont, IL, October 15-19, 2012
  71. Advanced Explosives Recognition, Central Valley Arson Investigators, Tulare, CA, one-day, May 4, 2013
  72. California Association of Criminalists, Of What We are Made Workshop, May 20 & 21(Spring) 2013, Lynne Herold & Don Johnson
  73. Pollen Microscopy Workshop, State Microscopical Society of Illinois, Chicago, IL, two-days, July 2013,  Michael L. Muilenberg  
  74. Microscopy of Paint, McCrone Research Institute, Chicago, IL, one-week, March 2014
  75. Advanced Explosives Recognition, Central Valley Arson Investigators, Tulare, CA, one-day, May 10, 2014

 

Supervisory & Leadership Training

  1. Supervision for Technical Employees, California Association of Crime Lab Directors, four hours, 1995
  2. Problem People at Work discussion, Marilyn Wheeler, one hour, 1995
  3. Management Problems of the Technical Person in a Leadership Role, Van Richards, Fred Pryor Seminars, CAC Semi-Annual Seminar, October 9, 1996
  4. Preparing for Supervision, PSI Santa Ana College, one day, September 10, 1999
  5. Supervision, Management 123, Rancho Santiago College, Fall Semester, 2004
  6. Creative Leadership Workshop for Managers, Supervisors, and Team Leaders, one day, CareerTrack®,  Anaheim, CA, January 25, 2006
  7. Proactive Leadership Strategies, Jack Enter, POST #2060-10140-05001, four hours, Orange County, CA, June 2006
  8. EEO Training, four hours, Anaheim, CA, June 2006
  9. ASCLD/LAB-International Preparation Course, American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors Laboratory Accreditation Board, three days, Santa Ana, CA, February 14-16, 2007
  10. Enlightened Leadership Training, sixteen hours, Orange, CA, October, 2007
  11. Emergency Management ICS-300 and ICS-400, FEMA, Orange, CA, three-day course, March 2008
  12. Supervisor (Update) Training, CEO/Office of Risk Management, Safety and Loss Prevention Program, three hours, June 18, 2008
  13. Career Survival, POST #2060-22326-06002, eight hours, Orange County, CA, March 27, 2007
  14. Injury and Illness Prevention for Supervisors, OC Sheriff-Coroner Department, four hours, Anaheim, CA, May 2007
  15. Creative Leadership Workshop for Managers, Supervisors, and Team Leaders, one day, CareerTrack®,  Anaheim, CA, October 2008
  16. Leading as a Way of Serving, OC Leadership Lessons, Santa Ana, CA, two-day class, November 2008
  17. Preventing Workplace Harassment – California Supervisor’s 2nd Edition, County of Orange, online training, June 24, 2009
  18. Reasonable Accommodation of Disabilities 2nd Edition, County of Orange, online training, June 30, 2009
  19. Forensic Education Program Accreditation Commission Inspector Workshop, AAFS meeting, Seattle, WA, one-day, February, 2010
  20. American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors Laboratory Accreditation Board (ASCLD-LAB) Introduction to ISO/IEC 17025:2005 Course, October 10, 2011
  21. American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors Laboratory Accreditation Board (ASCLD-LAB) Assessor Training Class, October 11-14, 2011

 

Criminalistics Employment

1.         a.  Criminalist, Los Angeles Sheriff Department, Scientific Services Bureau, Jan 3 – March 20, 2012:  Training in gunshot residue analysis. Responsible for having microscope manufacturers bring microscopes to the laboratory for evaluation before purchase.

            b.  Senior Criminalist, March 21, 2012 – present:  Successfully completed gunshot residue training in September 2012 then began analysis of cases for gunshot residue analysis.  Began explosives training and competency testing 2013.

2.       Senior Forensic Scientist, Orange County Sheriff-Coroner/OC Crime Lab, May 2008 – March 10, 2011,  Controlled Substances:  I performed the duties of supervisor of the controlled substances section. My responsibilities included leadership, writing personnel evaluations, time and assignment scheduling, maintaining morale, coordinating court testimony, monitoring court testimony per accreditation requirements, monitoring productivity and quality of the section and individuals, and with the assistance of my team, reduced a backlog of 1100 cases to less than 300 in four months and maintained the low backlog for approximately one-year. Additional duties included updating the quality system manual to meet accreditation standards; recommended budgets for training and vendor contracts; evaluating, purchasing, and validating new instrumentation; coordinated a furniture build-out in the laboratory, purchasing consumable laboratory supplies and materials, acquiring designer and scheduled drug standards, completing management assigned tasks, and other related duties. With a forensic intern and a forensic scientist, developed a new method for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometer to analyze a general unknowns to state an evidential exhibit has no controlled substances detected.

August 2007 – February 2008,  Forensic Alcohol & Toxicology (AM&PM)

March 2006 – May 2008, Toxicology (AM&PM)

           Performing duties of supervisor of the toxicology section and when the forensic alcohol section supervisor resigned, supervised both sections for five months with a total of 24 personnel. My responsibilities included leadership, maintaining morale, writing personnel evaluations, time and assignment scheduling, coordinating court testimony, monitoring court testimony per accreditation requirements, insuring breath instrument repair, monitoring productivity and quality in both sections, upgrading toxicology to ASCLD-LAB International standards as well as editing and updating the quality system manual, aligning the forensic alcohol section manual to section standards, recommending budgets for training and vendor contracts, evaluating, purchasing, and validating new instrumentation, purchasing consumable laboratory supplies and materials, completing management assigned tasks, and other related duties.

3.       Criminalist, Senior Criminalist, Forensic Scientist III, (July 1980 – March 2006), Acting Senior Forensic Scientist (May 1995 - August 1996, 15 months), Orange County Sheriff-Coroner/OC Crime Lab:  At the bench level, my assignments include forensic alcohol program (blood, urine, and breath), controlled substances/drugs of abuse analysis section, trace evidence section including paint comparison, glass comparison, mineral identification, determination of hair for DNA analysis, completion of hair comparison training, analysis of many types of unusual trace evidence, explosives analysis, lachrymator analysis, collection and analysis of fire debris for ignitable liquids, and briefly in ante-mortem toxicology. I have been involved in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of evidence from autopsy, vehicle examination, and crime scene (death investigation including fire and post-blast bombing).

For nearly eleven years (February 1989 to 2001) I was responsible for the County fixed and controlled asset (capital assets) laboratory inventory audits converting a manual system to a computerized location system. I provided cost estimates and recommendations to the supervisor for purchasing instruments including gas chromatographs, comparison light microscope, polarized light microscopes, a variety of other microscopes, infrared spectroscopy instrumentation, accessories, and spectral libraries, photographic and photomicrographic equipment, a glass refractive index measuring (GRIM) system, and other trace evidence section equipment, supplies, chemicals, and accessories were part of my duties.

I provided leadership and was technical leader for the trace evidence section beginning in early 1994, then promoted to Acting Senior Forensic Scientist (Supervisor) of the trace evidence and questioned document sections from May 1995 - August 1996.  From January to August of 1996, the Evidence Control Unit was also under my supervision.  As a Forensic Scientist III and as Acting Senior Forensic Scientist of the trace evidence section, I wrote or supervised the writing of methods, procedures, and training manuals in various areas of trace evidence analysis, personally trained or supervised the training of forensic scientists, proposed capital asset purchases, performed case work on complicated or high profile trace evidence cases, and requested purchase of standards and consumable items. Additionally, as supervisor, I wrote and provided personnel evaluations, completed manager directed projects, managed contracts for instrument maintenance, and dealt with employee/personnel problems, work and time off schedules. Because of insufficient staffing and a county bankruptcy, I coordinated trace evidence personnel assignments with supervisors of the crime scene investigation, forensic alcohol, and controlled substance analysis units to maximize analysts’ time to cover laboratory needs.  In August of 1996, I was reassigned to casework duties while retaining a leadership role in the trace evidence section. I have been involved in quality assurance audits for laboratory accreditation. For nearly 25 years I directed and supervised student interns in various projects for several areas of the laboratory.

I trained police officers and phlebotomist technicians to be certified operators for the 4011A and 5000 series Intoxilyzer®. I taught other criminalists instrumental analysis and microscopical methods of evidence characterization and identification to forensic scientists both in-house as well as from other laboratories including the analytical approaches to a variety of unusual trace evidence.

 I am familiar with and can use stereomicroscopes (SLM), polarized light microscopes (PLM), scanning electron microscopes with energy dispersive x-ray detector (SEM-EDX), gas chromatographs with flame ionization detector (GC-FID), with mass spectrometry detectors (GC-MS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) bench and with attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FTIR), FTIR microscope, the UV-VIS micro-spectrophotometer, ultra-violet spectroscopy, hot stage microscopy, chemical microscopy, chemical color tests, thin layer chromatography (TLC), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

I have qualified as an expert in over one hundred thirty cases in two states. My testimony includes areas of blood, urine, and breath alcohol analysis, interpretation of blood alcohol levels relating to driving-under-the-influence, drug analysis, fire debris analysis, homicide scene and autopsy evidence collection, explosives analysis, and miscellaneous trace evidence cases.

Accomplished projects

  • Established an outline for an in-house course on Aspects of Courtroom Testimony for new criminalists and assisted in teaching the early classes
  • Wrote the practical exercises and assisted in teaching the in-house class on microscopy/polarized light microscopy
  • Developed a training course and handouts for the laboratory to help train new deputy district attorneys to learn the capabilities and limitations of forensic alcohol, controlled substances, and toxicology sections.
  • Organized and computerized the laboratory fixed and controlled asset lists which reduced audit time to one-and-a-half days from more than a week
  • Originated the drug analysis case note worksheets used by Controlled Substances analysts  
  • Developed an FTIR library of inorganic chemical, and explosives standards  
  • During construction of the laboratory, designed the Trace section floor plan and work bays in the trace evidence lab
  • Created an ignitable liquids database with two other analysts that includes approximately 400 samples. Collectively this database and a software program created by one of the analysts was to be distributed by Agilent Technologies
  • Created a smokeless powder database for brand characterization
  • Completed a project with the help of interns and toxicologists to compile a decade of post mortem (PM) case data to help in quantitating tissue samples and interpreting PM drug levels.


4.          1979 - 1980.  Student Aide, San Mateo County Sheriff Crime Laboratory.  Duties included drug analysis, paint comparison and analysis, arson analysis, firearms work up, firearm and toolmark comparison under criminalist supervision, cataloging a firearm reference collection, and other duties as assigned.

 5.          1978.  Forensic Chemist, State of Idaho, Department of Health, Bureau of Laboratories, Forensic Science Section. I performed drug analysis, blood, urine, and breath alcohol analysis and qualified in Idaho Municipal Court in the areas of forensic alcohol and drug analysis.

 6.          1975 - 1977.  Student Aide – Crime Scene Technician, University of California at Berkeley, Police Department.  Duties included developing latent fingerprints, comparison of fingerprints, crime scene investigation including homicide, officer-involved shooting, burglary, rape, arson, and auto burglary, evidence transportation to and from the county crime laboratory, assist detectives in the evaluation of physical evidence relating to a case and its significance.

Licenses/Certificates

  1. Forensic Alcohol Supervisor, California Department of Health
  2. Certified Intoxilyzer 4011A operator
  3. Certified Intoxilyzer 5000 operator
  4. Diplomate, American Board of Criminalistics, 1994 – present              
  5. Fellow, Drug Identification, American Board of Criminalistics, 1994 – 2013
  6. Resigned, Drug Identification, American Board of Criminalistics, 2014
  7. Fellow, Fire Debris Analysis, American Board of Criminalistics, 1995 – 2013
  8. Diplomate, Fire Debris Analysis, American Board of Criminalistics, 2014

Selected Publications

  1. “Capillary Gas Chromatography Characterization and Classification of Some Hydrocarbon Solvents and Alkyl Glycol Ethers,” The CACNews Winter 1996: 8 - 11i, Co-author Dickan, T.
  2. “A Brief Background and Justification for the Continued Use of Microcrystal Tests,” The CAC News, Summer 2000
  3. “Daily Analytical Problem Solving in Criminalistics with Rapid and Reliable Advanced Instrumentation – The Microscope,” Microsc. Microanal. 7 (Suppl 2: Proceedings), Microscopy Society of America, 2001
  4. “Death by Paint Thinner,” Journal of Analytical Toxicology  Vol. 26, October 2002, Co-author Collison, I.
  5. “The Identification of Kava,” The CACNews 3rd Quarter 2002, Co-author Blackledge, R.
  6. “Contributions of Dr. Walter McCrone to Criminalistics,” Microsc. Microanal. 9 (Suppl 2: Proceedings) Microscopy Society of America, 2003
  7. “Dr. Walter McCrone: Contributions to Criminalistics,” Microscope, First Quarter 2004
  8. “Microscope Basics and Beyond,” Book Review in The Journal of Scanning Microscopies, Vol. 26: 4, July/August 2004
  9. “Advanced Criminalistics,” Developed one-month online course FSC 620, National University, 2003
  10. “Documentation – the Difference Between Homicide and Suicide,” Chapter 10, in Crime Scene Documentation: A Realistic Approach to Investigating Crime Scenes, Goodall, J. and Hawks, C., Law-Tech Custom Publishers, 2004
  11. “Characterization of Smokeless Powder,” Chapter 10, in Forensic Analysis on the Cutting Edge New Methods for Trace Evidence Analysis, Edited by R. Blackledge,  J Wiley & Sons, 2007
  12. “Forensic Science,” Chapter 41, in Biology, DeSalle, R. and Heithaus, M.R. (Editors), Holt, Rinehart, & Winston; 2008, Co-author with Sid Rogers
  13. “Cautions on Brand Identification of Ignitable Liquids,” The CACNews  4th Quarter 2008: 25-29   
  14. “Forensic Interns: Force Multipliers in the Crime Lab,” Forensic Science Policy & Management, Taylor & Francis, March 2012
  15. “Trace Evidence” section in Crime Scene Investigation A Guide for Law Enforcement, member of Review Committee, National Forensic Science Technology Center and US Department of Justice, September 2013
  16. “A Method to Reduce Analytical Time for a Wide Range of Controlled Substances When the Initial Method is Negative,” Co-Authors Miller J and Seylors C, The CACNews 4th Quarter 2013: 12-17

 

Other Publications/Press

  1. Detonations, Moorehead, W., Tieline 1989: 14(1); 83-4.
  2. Forensic Analysis, Letter to the Editor, Chemical &Engineering News (C&EN), American Chemical Society, February 4, 2002
  3. Careers for 2003 and Beyond, No PhD? No Problem, Interview, Marasco, C., C&EN, May 19, 2003
  4. Forensic False Start, Letter to the Editor, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), American Chemical Society, July 25, 2005

 

Technical Presentations

  1. "Introduction to Explosives," presented at the Southern California Arson and Explosives Study Group meeting in Riverside, 1985
  2. "Orange County Forensic Laboratory Capabilities," presented at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Bomb Scene Investigators Course, Anaheim, 1987
  3. "Usable Quantity: Case Decision Review," presented at California Association of Criminalists (CAC) Semiannual Seminar, Costa Mesa, 1988
  4. "Comparison of Post Recovery Arson Accelerant Storage Containers Using Carbon Disulfide as the Volatile Liquid," CAC Semiannual Seminar, Costa Mesa, 1988
  5. "Blood to Breath Alcohol Comparison Using the Intoxilyzer 5000 - Preliminary Findings," Co-author, CAC Semiannual Seminar, Costa Mesa, 1988
  6. "Motivation of the Professional Employee," CAC Semi-Annual Seminar, Costa Mesa, 1988
  7. "Career Development of the Professional," Co-author and Presenter, CAC Semiannual Seminar, Costa Mesa, 1988
  8. "Explosives Analysis and Micro-techniques," Hands-On Workshop CAC Trace Evidence Study Group, 1989
  9. Review of FBI - FTIR Seminar for the CAC Southern Drug and Trace Evidence Study Groups, March, 1993
  10. "Under the Microscope: The hidden evidence," International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators Region I (Western Region) Seminar, September, 1993
  11. "Refractive Index and Dispersion Staining," CAC Trace Evidence Study Group, 1990/Los Angeles Microscopical Society, 1994
  12. “Explosives Analysis in the Crime Laboratory”, Los Angeles Microscopical Society, Santa Monica, April, 1995
  13. “Polarized Light Microscopy in the Forensic Science Laboratory”, Inter/Micro, Chicago, Illinois, 1995
  14.  “Capillary Gas Chromatography Characterization of Some Hydrocarbon Solvents and Alkyl Glycol Ethers”, Co - author and Presenter, Poster Session International Symposium on the Forensic Aspects of Arson Investigations, George Mason University, 1995
  15. “Unusual Particles from Two Homicide Post-Mortem Examinations”, CAC Semi-Annual Seminar, October, 1995
  16. “Capillary Gas Chromatography Characterization of some Hydrocarbon Solvents and Alkyl Glycol Ethers”, Co - author and Presenter, CAC Semi-Annual Seminar, October, 1995
  17. “Paradigm Collection Modes, Analytical Regimens, and Instrumental Techniques of a Forensic Microanalysis Section or Trace Evidence: Collection and Analysis”, California State Division of the International Association for Identification, 81st Educational Seminar, May, 1997
  18. “Dispersion Changes in Some Cargille Refractive Index Liquids”, Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL., 1997; CAC Semi-Annual Seminar, San Diego, CA, 1998
  19. “A Tale of Two Danas; Influences in Mineralogy”, Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, 1997
  20. “An Introduction to Microscopical Feather Identification”, Co - author and Presenter, Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, 1997“
  21. A Novel Use of a Stereomicroscope Transmitted Light Base for Image Contrast Enhancement”, Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, 1998
  22. “Micro-techniques with an Emphasis in Explosives”, Coordinator and Presenter, CAC   One-Day Workshop in March, 1999
  23. “Analytical Microscopy: Then, Now, and Tomorrow”, American Chemical Society,  Western Regional Meeting, Ontario, CA, October, 1999
  24. “Forensic Microscopy”, American Chemical Society, National Meeting, San Francisco, March, 2000
  25. “From the Last Millennium – Selected References for the Analytical Microscopist”, Inter/Micro, June, 2001
  26. “A Brief Background and Justification for the Continued Use of Microcrystal Tests”, Inter/Micro, June, 2001
  27. “Daily Analytical Problem Solving in Criminalistics with Rapid and Reliable Advanced Instrumentation – The Microscope”, Microscopical Society of America, August, 2001
  28. “Pyramid Analysis of Forensic Microscopy”, Inter/Micro-2003, Chicago, IL, July 2003
  29. “Digital Camera Use for the Forensic and Amateur Microscopist”, Inter/Micro-2003, Chicago, IL, July 2003
  30. “Contributions of Dr. McCrone to Criminalistics”, Microscopy Society of America, Seminar, San Antonio, TX., August 2003 California Association of Criminalists, Semi-Annual Seminar, October 2004
  31. “A Laboratory Perspective on Bombing Crime Scenes”, International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators, Region I Seminar, Anaheim, CA, September 23, 2003, Invited Speaker, 1.5 hours
  32. “Practical Identity Using Microcrystal Tests”, Inter/Micro-2004, Chicago, IL, July 2004 American Academy of Forensic Science, New Orleans, LA, February 2005
  33. “The Characterization of Reloading Smokeless Powders Toward Brand Identification Part One,” Co-author and presenter American Academy of Forensic Science, New Orleans, LA, 2005, Technical Working Group on Fire and Explosives Symposium, Orlando, FL, 2005, Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, 2006
  34. “The Characterization of Reloading Smokeless Powders Toward Brand Identification-Part Two,” Co-author and presenter American Academy of Forensic Science, Seattle, WA, February 2006, California Association of Criminalists, , CA, May, 2007
  35. “Scenario Building in Forensic Science,” Workshop, Moorehead & Rogers, S, 1½ hours National Science Teacher’s Association, Anaheim, CA, April 2006
  36. “Detection of Trace Organic Explosives on Bomb Squad Equipment by Ion-Trap GC-MS Using Electron Impact (EI) and Negative Ion Chemical Ionization (NICI)” Contributing author, presenter Aletha Basconcillo, Graduate Student, Pace University, CAC Semi-Annual seminar, 2007
  37. “Applications of Fire Debris Analysis to Problems in Toxicology,” California Association of Criminalists, Semi-Annual Seminar, San Diego, CA, May 2008, Co-author and presenter, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Seattle, WA, February 2010, Co-author and presenter
  38. “Case Studies in Criminalistics,” Workshop, DeForest P, Diaczuk P, Hietpas, J, and Moorehead W, Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, July 2008
  39. “How to Teach Microscopy (High School)-Methods and Practice,” Microscopical Society of Southern California, Santa Monica, CA, January 2009
  40. “Myth Busting the Light Microscope,” Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, July 2009, Forensic Science Educational Conference, San Jose, CA, July 2012, July 2013
  41. “Trace Evidence,” Workshop , DeForest P, Diaczuk P, Brinsko, K, and Moorehead W, NYPD Trace Section, Jamaica, NY, October 2009, 35th Annual NEAFS Meeting, Long Branch, NJ, Nov 4-7, 2009
  42. “Meeting the Forensic Need,” Forensic Science Education Forum, MAFS/MFRC, Indianapolis, IN, June 2010
  43. “A Database of Drug Body Distribution and Concentration, Cause of Death, in Coroner’s Cases 2000 – 2009: A Supplement to References,” California Association of Toxicologists, Anaheim, CA, November 2010, Invited Speaker (Co-author)  “A Decade of Deaths in the OC Where Drugs Were Detected,” American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Chicago, IL, February 2011, Co-author, Dr. Ines Collison presenter
  44. “An Update on Refractive Index Liquid nD = 1.580,” Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, July 2011
  45. “Creation and Accomplishments of a Forensic Internship Program,” Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, July 2011, California Association of Criminalists Semi-annual seminar, Sacramento, CA, Oct. 26, 2011
  46. Workshop:  "Micro Analytical Techniques" one-day, California Association of Criminalists Semi-annual seminar, Bakersfield, CA,  Spring 2012
  47. Workshop : "Fire Debris Analysis including a Demonstration of Incendiary and Hypergolic Mixtures", one-day, California Association of Criminalists Semi-annual seminar, San Jose, CA, Fall 2012 with Christine Henry and Dr. John DeHaan co-presenters
  48. “A Study of Select Refractive Index Liquid Stability, Series A and Series AA,” Co-author / presenter Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, July 2013, California Association of Criminalists Semi-annual Seminar, San Diego, CA May 2014
  49. "A Study of Select Refractive Index Liquid Stability, Series B and Series E,” Co-author / not presenter,  Inter/Micro, Chicago, IL, June 2014

 

Appointments and Achievements

  1. Vice President, Forensic Science Students Association, UC Berkeley 1976
  2. Chairman of the Southern California Arson and Explosives Study Group, 1985
  3. Editor of the Journal of the Meetings of the Southern California Arson and Explosives Study Group, 1985
  4. Co-editor of the Arson and Explosives Newsletter, 1987-1988
  5. Co-chairperson of the Southern California Arson and Explosives Study Group, 1988
  6. Liaison for the California Association of Criminalists and the International Association of Arson Investigators, 1988
  7. Co-chairperson/Chairperson, Trace Evidence Study Group, California Association of Criminalists, second half 1988 to July 1999 and April 2001 to 2005
  8. Desk Top Publisher, American Board of Criminalistics Newsletter, 1994 & 1995 and American Board of Criminalistics Certification News, 1996
  9. Elected to the Certification Examination Review Committee of the CAC, Fall 1995 to 1998
  10. CAC Public Information Committee, Fall 1995 - May 1998
  11. Special Recognition in Graduate Studies for Superior Scholastic Achievement, Fortieth Annual Honors Convocation, April 2001
  12. Assistant Chairman, Explosives Database Committee, Technical Working Group for Fire and Explosives (TWGFEX), November 2003 to 2006
  13. Chairman, Microcrystal Test Symposium, Inter/Micro, Chicago, Illinois, July 2004.
  14. Southern Regional Director, elected, California Association of Criminalists, May 2005
  15. Gold Star Award Winner, Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Department, July 2005
  16. FEPAC Inspector, Practitioner, October:  Hawaii 2010, Texas 2011, Texas 2013
  17. ASCLD-LAB Technical Assessor, Louisiana 2013

Professional Organizations

Phi Kappa Phi, graduate student honor society, member since 1999

American Academy of Forensic Science, member in 2005, Fellow 2010 to present

California Association of Criminalists - provisional member 1988, full member 1989 - present

American Society of Trace Evidence Examiners (ASTEE) 2011-present

International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators member since 1985

Technical Working Group on Fire and Explosives (TWGFEX) member 1996 to 2006, 2010-2013

American Chemical Society, member since 1999

American Society of Testing and Materials ASTM, member 1996-2007, 2013

Microscopical Society of Southern California, member since 1996

Fire Chief's Association/Arson Investigators Section - member 1984 - 1998

State Microscopical Society of Illinois, corresponding member since 1986

International Association of Arson Investigators - member 1988 - 1993

California Association of Criminalists - Student Affiliate 1976 – 1977